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Health

How to Get Back on Keto: The Complete Guide

Starting keto again? Getting back on keto can sometimes be more complicated than starting keto in the first place. Starting involves change and hope while starting again involves pain and regret.

You know what you’re capable of, both good and bad. Many people jump into keto with both feet, only to find themselves months down the road gorging on sweets during the holidays, or eating sweets at a barbeque. 

Slip-ups don’t mean that keto is not right for you. Far from it! In this article, we’ll explain five ways how to get back on keto. 

Five Tips on How to Start Keto Again

Many people “fall off the wagon” when trying the keto diet. That’s okay. Starting again means that you have the opportunity to try again smarter, wiser. Rather than focusing on the negative, instead, put that energy into finding strategies to manage cravings. Here are five ways how to start keto again. 

1. Understand That No One Is Perfect

According to Dana Hunnes, a senior dietician at UCLA Medical Center and an assistant professor at UCLA’s Fielding School of Public Health, she recommends that to practice the keto diet, it’s essential to let go of a perfectionist mindset. 

Keto is a different type of diet in that it is a lifestyle diet. That means that you aren’t on it for a short period of time. Instead, it’s an adjustment and recalibration of your daily eating habits.

That can take time to change, especially if you’re a carb lover. Having an all-or-nothing mentality only makes it harder. So understanding that you have a craving for sweets doesn’t have to be a dealbreaker. 

There is a wealth of resources out there for keto snacks, like the SuperFat keto snacks resource. It’s about replacing your old foods, not removing them altogether. 

2. Take a Targeted Approach

Liz Weinandy, a lead outpatient dietician for nutrition services at Ohio State University, states it is better to start again with a targeted approach by not stopping carbs cold-turkey.

That is because stopping carbs too fast can have adverse effects, like keto flu. Instead, Weinandy recommends cutting carbs with a targeted approach, such as cutting 25 carbs per day until you get down to your goal. 

Creating a gradual transition into your keto diet can help you ease back in. It also provides small victories to celebrate as you decrease your carbs and get to your goal. 

3. Track Your Macros

If you dove into keto with both feet, cut out carbs, and ate protein like it was going out of style before. The problem could be that you were not fueling yourself in the right way. 

For a. more effective approach to keto, it can be helpful to use apps to help you track your macros. The typical macro ratio for someone on the keto diet is: 

  • 5% of food coming from carbs
  • 25% of food coming from protein
  • 70% of food coming from fat

If this shocks you, then you know you weren’t eating keto the correct way. Fat is a significant part of the keto diet. Fat gives the feeling of satiation and provides the opportunity for ketosis to set in. 

Instead of thinking about all the foods, you can’t eat on a diet, instead, think of all the healthy ways you can fuel your body. By changing your mindset around food, and more importantly, fat consumption, you can wrap your mind around a new way of eating. 

It’s not about eating fewer carbs as much as it is a paradigm shift in the way you think about food. 

4. Remember to Stay Hydrated

The keto diet decreases carbs and your dependence on processed food, which also cuts down on your electrolytes. As you cut electrolytes, it is crucial to replace them. Water is essential for storing electrolytes. 

The keto diet burns fat rather than glucose for fuel, so in essence, the keto diet has a diuretic effect on the body. It’s essential to keep a balance of electrolytes as they can get flushed out from the keto diet causing symptoms like keto flu. 

Electrolytes are essential minerals found in your blood, like sodium, magnesium, calcium, and potassium. These four minerals are vital to normal bodily functions. If your electrolytes are low, you may experience one or all of these symptoms: 

  • shakiness or feeling faint
  • brain fog
  • headaches
  • constipation or bloating

If you’ve experienced some of these symptoms while dieting before, it is most likely that you weren’t bringing enough electrolytes back into your system. Drinking water, eating green leafy vegetables, and consuming nuts and seeds can help restore electrolytes naturally. 

It’s important to drink enough water when on the keto diet to help restore electrolyte function and regulation. 

5. Eat More Whole Foods

A significant component of the keto diet is that it is a natural food diet that forces you to eliminate processed foods. We all know processed foods aren’t good for us, but the convenience of them in our lifestyle can make it hard to change. 

By committing to a whole-foods diet plan that adds more green leafy vegetables, nuts, seeds, and healthy fats like salmon, avocados, and olive oil can help stick to a diet free from processed foods. 

While it can be hard to adjust to a whole food diet, it is essential to create a sustainable, healthy dive into the keto diet. Cutting processed food out of your diet is a decision to take back control of your health.

Starting Again, Smarter and Wiser

Succumbing to bouts of carb craving is only natural when we are learning the process of how to get back on keto, but with setbacks, you can begin again smarter and wiser. 

Lifestyle choices are different than diets, and you owe it to yourself to give yourself some slack when getting back on keto. 

If you found this article helpful, please look around our site for more helpful advice about food, recipes, dieting, and more.  

Starting keto again? Getting back on keto can sometimes be more complicated than starting keto in the first place. Starting involves change and hope while starting again involves pain and regret.

You know what you’re capable of, both good and bad. Many people jump into keto with both feet, only to find themselves months down the road gorging on sweets during the holidays, or eating sweets at a barbeque. 

Slip-ups don’t mean that keto is not right for you. Far from it! In this article, we’ll explain five ways how to get back on keto. 

Five Tips on How to Start Keto Again

Many people “fall off the wagon” when trying the keto diet. That’s okay. Starting again means that you have the opportunity to try again smarter, wiser. Rather than focusing on the negative, instead, put that energy into finding strategies to manage cravings. Here are five ways how to start keto again. 

1. Understand That No One Is Perfect

According to Dana Hunnes, a senior dietician at UCLA Medical Center and an assistant professor at UCLA’s Fielding School of Public Health, she recommends that to practice the keto diet, it’s essential to let go of a perfectionist mindset. 

Keto is a different type of diet in that it is a lifestyle diet. That means that you aren’t on it for a short period of time. Instead, it’s an adjustment and recalibration of your daily eating habits.

That can take time to change, especially if you’re a carb lover. Having an all-or-nothing mentality only makes it harder. So understanding that you have a craving for sweets doesn’t have to be a dealbreaker. 

There is a wealth of resources out there for keto snacks, like the SuperFat keto snacks resource. It’s about replacing your old foods, not removing them altogether. 

2. Take a Targeted Approach

Liz Weinandy, a lead outpatient dietician for nutrition services at Ohio State University, states it is better to start again with a targeted approach by not stopping carbs cold-turkey.

That is because stopping carbs too fast can have adverse effects, like keto flu. Instead, Weinandy recommends cutting carbs with a targeted approach, such as cutting 25 carbs per day until you get down to your goal. 

Creating a gradual transition into your keto diet can help you ease back in. It also provides small victories to celebrate as you decrease your carbs and get to your goal. 

3. Track Your Macros

If you dove into keto with both feet, cut out carbs, and ate protein like it was going out of style before. The problem could be that you were not fueling yourself in the right way. 

For a. more effective approach to keto, it can be helpful to use apps to help you track your macros. The typical macro ratio for someone on the keto diet is: 

  • 5% of food coming from carbs
  • 25% of food coming from protein
  • 70% of food coming from fat

If this shocks you, then you know you weren’t eating keto the correct way. Fat is a significant part of the keto diet. Fat gives the feeling of satiation and provides the opportunity for ketosis to set in. 

Instead of thinking about all the foods, you can’t eat on a diet, instead, think of all the healthy ways you can fuel your body. By changing your mindset around food, and more importantly, fat consumption, you can wrap your mind around a new way of eating. 

It’s not about eating fewer carbs as much as it is a paradigm shift in the way you think about food. 

4. Remember to Stay Hydrated

The keto diet decreases carbs and your dependence on processed food, which also cuts down on your electrolytes. As you cut electrolytes, it is crucial to replace them. Water is essential for storing electrolytes. 

The keto diet burns fat rather than glucose for fuel, so in essence, the keto diet has a diuretic effect on the body. It’s essential to keep a balance of electrolytes as they can get flushed out from the keto diet causing symptoms like keto flu. 

Electrolytes are essential minerals found in your blood, like sodium, magnesium, calcium, and potassium. These four minerals are vital to normal bodily functions. If your electrolytes are low, you may experience one or all of these symptoms: 

  • shakiness or feeling faint
  • brain fog
  • headaches
  • constipation or bloating

If you’ve experienced some of these symptoms while dieting before, it is most likely that you weren’t bringing enough electrolytes back into your system. Drinking water, eating green leafy vegetables, and consuming nuts and seeds can help restore electrolytes naturally. 

It’s important to drink enough water when on the keto diet to help restore electrolyte function and regulation. 

5. Eat More Whole Foods

A significant component of the keto diet is that it is a natural food diet that forces you to eliminate processed foods. We all know processed foods aren’t good for us, but the convenience of them in our lifestyle can make it hard to change. 

By committing to a whole-foods diet plan that adds more green leafy vegetables, nuts, seeds, and healthy fats like salmon, avocados, and olive oil can help stick to a diet free from processed foods. 

While it can be hard to adjust to a whole food diet, it is essential to create a sustainable, healthy dive into the keto diet. Cutting processed food out of your diet is a decision to take back control of your health.

Starting Again, Smarter and Wiser

Succumbing to bouts of carb craving is only natural when we are learning the process of how to get back on keto, but with setbacks, you can begin again smarter and wiser. 

Lifestyle choices are different than diets, and you owe it to yourself to give yourself some slack when getting back on keto. 

If you found this article helpful, please look around our site for more helpful advice about food, recipes, dieting, and more.  

Categories
Health

8 Ways to support intestinal microbial balance and proper digestion

The body’s digestive system contains almost 100 trillion bacteria. The majority of these bacteria are found in your intestines and they can be both good and bad. Whilst some protect you against disease, others can actually lead to the development of disease. As such, supporting a positive intestinal microbial balance can help you to lead a healthier life. In this post, we will look at 8 to promote a good microbial balance and proper digestion.

8 science-backed ways improved digestion

A good microbial balance fosters proper digestion. Moreover, it can help prevent and/or ameliorate health conditions like heart disease, arthritis, and even cancer. Here, we outline 8 ways you can improve your natural microbial balance and support your good gut microbiota.

  1. Vegetables, fruits, and legumes are your friends

Everyone knows that fruit and vegetables are good for their health. When it comes to the bacteria in your gut, this is because of them being high in fiber. Fiber is great for digestion and also helps good bacteria grow. Legumes like lentils, chickpeas, and beans generally are also all high in fiber. 

Studies have shown that fiber is particularly good for preventing heart disease, chronic diseases, and colon cancers. However, it is always important to remember that no one supplement, mineral, or vitamin is a magic bullet cure for these things. Nevertheless, a high fiber diet full of vegetables, fruit, and legumes will be a vital component of a healthy digestive system and a healthy body and mind.

  1. Eat a wide range of foods

It can be tempting to look up the foods that are high in fiber and focus on getting as many of them into your system as possible. However, it is also important to eat a varied diet to foster a positive intestinal microbial balance. This is because the trillions of bacteria in your gut are varied and made up of different species. Different ones benefit from different nutrients.

You also want to encourage a diverse range of microbiota to thrive in your gut. This will lead to a healthier digestive system with a greater chance of overall health benefits. However, according to the IDRC, just 15 plant and 5 animal species account for 75% of the world’s food production. Rural areas tend to offer more diversity in the sorts of foods available whilst foraging also offers rewards here for added variety.

  1. Avoid artificial sweeteners

The Western diet is full of sugar which can be bad for bodily health and digestion. However,  simply replacing sugar with things like artificial sweeteners doesn’t solve the problem. Studies show they can change the composition of the intestinal microbiota. They can also actually have negative effects on people’s blood sugar levels. 

As such, whilst artificial sweeteners can be beneficial in terms of preventing weight gain, it is best to seek your sweetness elsewhere. Particularly if you want to promote a healthy microbial balance and proper digestion.

  1. Add fermented foods to your diet

Most people have probably heard someone mention the benefits of fermented foods. Indeed, whilst they can be a bit of an acquired taste, they are great for the gut. This is because they are full of microbes like Lactobacilli and Enterobacteriaceae. These bacteria have been shown to have digestive benefits and help to prevent inflammatory and chronic diseases.

Fermented foods that are high in beneficial microbes included things like sauerkraut, kimchi, sourdough, and tempeh. Natural yogurt and kefir are also a good source of these types of beneficial microbes. Kombucha tea can also be drunk with similar benefits.

  1. Take prebiotics, probiotics, and essential oils

Prebiotics are foods and supplements that encourage beneficial microbe growth. Probiotics are the beneficial microorganisms themselves. Essential oils are also designed to support intestinal balance and proper digestion. These things can be particularly important if you have had to take a course of antibiotics as these kill off many of the beneficial gut microbiota. These essential oils can also be used by people with a lactose intolerance.

The bacteria fostered by prebiotics can be beneficial for people with high cholesterol levels as well as people who are obese. The key is fostering the growth of bifidobacteria which is good for gut health and fosters proper digestion.

  1. Eat more whole grains

Whole grains are packed full of fiber which already makes them a winner when it comes to good digestive health. However, they are also full of something even better, known as non-digestible carbs. Doesn’t sound great at first, but their non-digestible nature means they get further through your body and into your large intestine. 

Once in the large intestine, they are broken down and promote the growth of beneficial bacteria. Studies have shown that this can reduce the risk of non-communicable diseases, reduce inflammation, and reduce the risk of heart disease.

  1. Make sure you’re eating foods high in polyphenols

This bit of advice is the fun one as red wine is full of this stuff. Polyphenols can lower blood pressure, cholesterol, and inflammation. They are also hard for the body to break down and make it even further than through the body than whole grains. Indeed, they don’t get broken down until they reach the colon where they promote good bacteria to grow.

As well as being found in red wine, there is more good news. They can also be found in cocoa, chocolate, grapes, almonds, blueberries, and green tea, amongst other things. If you suffer from health conditions brought on by inflammation, then try adding these into your diet.

  1. Cut out (or down on) meat

Whilst it is important to eat a varied diet meat actually encourages the growth of bad bacteria. As such, it is best to cut it out of your diet or reduce how much of it you consume if you prefer not to give it up altogether. Plant-based diets are naturally high in fiber too which makes it easier to foster the right sort of bacterial growth. 

A healthy intestinal microbial balance fosters good health and proper digestion. The tips above are simple ways to achieve this backed up by science. Follow as many of them as possible and you’ll soon notice the benefits and reap the rewards.

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Health

How to Cut Back on Carbs: A Guide on Tasty Low-Carb Foods

Humans need carbohydrates to survive. Yet, we don’t need them in the huge quantities that we’re accustomed to.

This overindulgence in carbohydrates, especially simple carbohydrates, is the reason why 34 million American citizens suffer from diabetes today.

Nowadays, people view low-carb diets as a way to combat both these health issues as well as prevent weight gain.

If you’re interested in following this type of diet, here’s how to cut back on carbs without compromising on taste.

Say Goodbye to Bread 

White bread’s a weakness for most people. While this convenient food is readily available and easy to eat, it’s also high in carbs and very little else.

Even nutritious bread, like rye bread, contains around 15 g of carbs per slice and little fiber. 

Whole grain bread also contains many useful minerals and vitamins, but you can get these health benefits from other low-carb foods too. Vegetables, nuts, and seeds are good alternatives to bread. 

Nowadays there’s a wide range of vegetable-based bread available too. Try sweet potato bread, cauliflower bread, or lettuce leaves in place of wraps.

Cut Out the Sugary Drinks

Soda and alcohol are the best examples of high carb drinks around but fruit juice is also high in a type of sugar called fructose.

Rather opt for iced tea or club soda with a slice of orange or lemon. These drinks are just as refreshing as their high-sugar counterparts. 

How to Cut Back on Carbs for Breakfast

Breakfast is the one area where we’re conditioned to load up with carbs. Most traditional breakfast foods are high in carbs.

Toast, pastries, pancakes, and waffles are the obvious culprits, but even small amounts of healthy foods like granola are often high in carbohydrates.

The answer lies in eggs. Each egg contains only 1 gram of carbs, yet they’re full of high-quality protein which helps you feel satisfied for hours.

In this way, an egg breakfast helps you avoid adding to the problem by preventing carb cravings throughout the day. 

Boiling or poaching is the best way to enjoy the benefits of eggs without adding any fats to the equation. 

Opt for Low-Carb Snacks

It’s difficult to stay away from snacks at parties or while relaxing in front of the TV.

The good news is that you don’t have to without when you’re dedicated to eating food with low carbs.

Ditch the chips and popcorn, and choose some of these high-fiber tasty alternatives instead:

  • Almonds 
  • Cheese
  • Hazelnuts
  • Macadamia nuts 
  • Peanuts
  • Pecans
  • Walnuts

Be sure to keep ample supplies of these snack foods on hand to help you resist high-carb snacks when the craving strikes.

Use Sugar Alternatives

If you can’t go without sweetness in your warm beverages, there are plenty of alternatives to sugar.

Honey might seem like a good option but, like fruit, it’s full of fructose and glucose, which are carbs.

You can try some of these commercially-available alternatives instead:

  • Erythritol is a type of sugar alcohol that not only raises blood sugar in the same way sugar does, but it also kills bacteria and could help prevent cavities
  • Stevia’s a product of the stevia plant from South America and can help lower blood sugar while increasing insulin sensitivity 
  • Xylitol is another sugar alcohol which combats tooth decay, reduces insulin resistance, and guards against obesity

Remember, it’s best to wean yourself off sweeteners totally but these alternatives can help you make the break. 

Find Alternatives to Milk

Believe it or not, milk and all dairy products also contain sugar in the form of lactose. A small splash of milk in your coffee or tea won’t do much harm, but drinking it by the glass is a no-no.

Coconut and almond milk are good alternatives and often come pre-prepared with added vitamins and minerals for a healthy kick. These drinks contain very small amounts of carbs, but they’re mostly comprised of water.

Check the labels when buying coconut or almond milk. Some varieties have added sugar. 

Greek yogurt and cheese are good low-carb dairy products with all the health benefits of milk. 

What About Eating Out?

When you’re following a low-carb diet, you don’t need to forego meals out or convenient deliveries either. To get an idea of what’s available out there, check it out

Some restaurants also offer low-carb options, but it’s easy to choose menu items containing food with little carbs too. 

Most meat dishes come with a side of starchy carbohydrates, like French fries. Ask your server to bring vegetables instead. If your meal comes with vegetables and starch, ask for an extra vegetable serving instead of potato or rice. 

Alternatively, order a side salad and choose a dish with no starch on the side.

Avoid gravy and sauces, they’re usually high in sugar, cream, and fat.  

Avoid High-Carb Vegetables

While vegetables are generally a food with few carbs, there are a few you should avoid while you’re on a low-carb diet. 

Potatoes, rice, corn, squash, and peas are high in carbs. Instead, stick to vegetables like peppers, cauliflower, broccoli, zucchini, cabbage, and green beans.

Vegetables are a vital source of minerals, vitamins, and anti-oxidants so you should never cut them out of your diet totally. 

Get Started on Your Low-Carb Journey

After a while, being conscious of how to cut back on carbs becomes second-nature. Take this article as a starting point in your learning curve towards a healthier, low-carb way of life.

There’s no reason to skimp on flavor, regardless of the diet you’re following.

Read some of our other posts for all the best advice on incorporating delicious, healthy eating into your life no matter what. 

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Health

Ken Kurson on Media Coverage of Health and Wellness

Ken Kurson has worked in various aspects of the media industry for an extended period of time. This has lent him a unique ability and perspective through which to view the way health matters have been covered by various media outlets. Indeed, with the Coronavirus pandemic – a health pandemic the likes of which we haven’t seen in over a century, there’s been a dialogue sparked about the role the media can play in informing the public about important information regarding health and wellness. There are indeed media properties among the coterie of outlets available to readers that have done an extraordinary job in recent years of devoting resources toward coverage of health-related matters.

There are outlets like HuffPost who have been ahead of the curve in this trend; and those outlets that have emphasized these important subjects as being news-worthy certainly deserve to be commended. After all, there is a significant public interest about health-oriented subjects, as there should be. For that reason, those outlets that have been prudent in expending and employing significant resources to shed a light on different health issues deserve to be applauded for their efforts.

Media advisers like Ken Kurson have an understanding of the power that media can have in informing the public about various issues. Ultimately, the media does have a critical role to play in enlightening the public of developments in the healthcare space, but also in how important it is to value their own health and wellness.

The Coronavirus has indeed been a health pandemic of a size and magnitude the likes of which few could have anticipated or foreseen. But the reality is that there are a multitude of other health crises that pre-dated the Coronavirus pandemic that also deserved more attention than they got.

The media outlets that covered the obesity pandemic, and continue efforts to shed light on that important issue deserve recognition and even gratitude. It’s a public service. Indeed, it’s a crisis that’s plaguing especially the youth of this country. A crisis that has spun out of control; and some media outlets have indeed done a good and tactful job of lending it the attention and spotlight it deserves.

After all, that’s the only way to properly raise awareness of a health pandemic and others similar to it . As more and more media outlets employ journalistic resources to cover important health-oriented subjects and stories, we should be prodding them on to do more in that respect. Clickbait-driven media content is something that there is unfortunately far too much of, in existence.

But having media outlets shed light on important issues that are in the public interest, such as issues related to health and wellness is indeed a public service of sorts.

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Health Uncategorized

Helen Lee Schifter on the Value of Maintaining a Healthy Diet

Helen Lee Schifter has written consistently about the need for there to be a more focused campaign on educating the public of the value of leading a healthier lifestyle. One of the main fundamental components in any such lifestyle, is of course maintaining a healthy dietary habit.

Health advocates like Helen have taken to Thrive Global to communicate to the masses about these issues. Eating healthy however in today’s day and age, does not have to mean compromising on the quality of foods that one is having. In fact, there are so many different options whether organic or gourmet, across a myriad of different cuisines that one can have, that are tasty.

Interestingly enough, although within society there clearly has been a slowness to reaching the understanding and recognition that one should be more rigorous, cautious and careful about one’s dietary habits, in the commercial space, there’s been recognition of the market for it . As such, so many different companies have emerged producing and marketing organic alternatives to different foods, that would normally not be available, pre-dating this development.

Helen Lee Schifter has been adamant about the need for people to take advantage of these options that continue to grow in their scale and scope. Unfortunately, many have not – and they’ve done so at the expense of their own personal health. This has of course been rather unfortunate. Having said that, it’s a trend that many health and wellness advocates are determined to change dramatically for the better.

There are ways to turn this situation around. Indeed, there’s no shortage of alternatives available to the public when it comes to healthy food options that are nonetheless tasty. Across so many different cuisines, these options exist. Whether American, Italian, Middle Eastern or any other type, different cuisines do indeed have organic and healthy options.

So with these options available, we must make a better effort to take advantage of these options. With an obesity epidemic that has plagued our nation’s youth and so many others, across other demographics, these changes need to be taken seriously. The only way we’ll be able to ultimately combat health crises such as the obesity pandemic, is by making an exerted effort to eat healthy. After all, as cliche as it may sound, there is some truth to the expression “you are what you eat.”