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A Closer Examination of CBD

hemp leaves on wooden background, seeds, cannabis oil extracts in jars.

CBD has become one of the most controversial medical issues of the past twenty-five years. To some, it’s a pharmaceutical godsend that has lifted crippling depression and pain; to others, it’s the embodiment of old-fashioned snake oil and should be banned and wiped out of existence as a total scam. But the middle ground between these two extreme views seems to be where cannabidiol is headed these days, especially in states such as Utah, where it has only been legalized for the past six years. Nowadays CBD products can be found everywhere from grocery stores and gas stations to pharmacies, and even online. 

Medical doctors continue to warn their patients who are considering using CBD that they should purchase it only from a large-scale and legitimate producer, not some mom-and-pop fly-by-night operation that does not guarantee the purity of their product. Otherwise, say medical and industry experts, there is a chance that the CBD will be contaminated with THC — the active ingredient in the ‘high’ that recreational users are looking for. 

A recent report by the World Health Organization says that pure CBD holds no threat of addiction. It can be taken safely in any form without becoming habit-forming.

While the World Health Organization has compiled quite a substantial list of ailments that CBD may be able to help control, the United States FDA is still warning the public that many, if not most, CBD manufacturers are making promises about their product that cannot be substantiated by approved research at this time. 

So it appears that much more CBD research needs to be done before the entire medical community, at least in the United States, will get completely behind CBD. Until then, consumers will simply need to make up their own minds, based on their own experience, as to the benefits of CBD for themselves and their loved ones.